The Continuing Saga Of Our Pines ~ The Tree Climber

I didn’t know quite what we were in for on the morning the tree trimmers arrived.  We’d never had even one tree professionally removed, much less forty-seven of them!  I decided to walk next-door and take a seat on my daughter’s deck.  From there, I had a great view of the activity going on in my yard.  Little did I know just how much activity would be going on–or that it was going to last for six days!

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I watched in awe as the tree climber, whose name was Scott,  walked straight up our sixty-five foot pines, thanks to the sharp spikes he strapped on the insides of his ankles!  He’d knock the small limbs loose, as he climbed, then re-position the safety rope surrounding his waist.  As he neared the tops of the smaller trees, sometimes the trees would gently sway under the pressure of his weight.  Did I mention that he usually had a running chain saw hanging from his side?

Scott always looped a rope around the top section of the tree that was about to be cut.  This aided the men on the ground in guiding where the cut tree would land after it was cut.  Sometimes the rope was also looped over another tree, so the cut tree could be gently eased down to the ground.  Many times, Scott would cut the tops of the trees off, other times, he’d leave much of the top in place. I always enjoyed watching Scott quickly slide down the rope as he descended from the tops of those tall trees, once his work up there was done.

Most of the time, Scott would do the tree cutting, too, while one or two other men held tension on the guide ropes that he’d secured to the top of the tree.  It was interesting to watch the men with the ropes run out of the way, once the cut tree actually began to fall toward them!  Some of the trees hit the ground with such force, they seemed to vibrate the ground!  I don’t know whose job is the most dangerous, the tree climber or the rope handlers, but since I’m afraid of heights, I’d choose tree climbing as the scariest.

Scott often had to rest after climbing and cutting several trees in a row.  He was in great shape, so it must be very difficult to pull your body weight straight up a tree, especially using those spikes on your ankles.    Scott shared that he had been climbing and cutting trees for thirty-four years, and still loved it!  Then he also shared his amazing story with Ed.

First of all, we learned that our 65′ pine trees were small in comparison to many of the trees Scott’s climbed and cut.  He said that cutting the tops out of some trees can “give you quite a ride” as the tree whips back and forth after the top is cut out.  He also shared that he once fell out of a bucket truck and through a concrete picnic table!  In doing so, he basically ‘trashed’ one whole side of his body.  He has screws in his ankle, a rod in his leg, an implant in his hip, and I can’t remember what else!  He also suffered some facial injuries, which are evident in one of his eyes.  It’s a miracle that Scott’s alive, since he wasn’t expected to live, but it’s a double miracle that he’s alive and still able to climb trees for a living!!!

Scott’s boss shared that one of Scott’s toughest obstacles, after the accident, was overcoming his fear, and climbing back into a bucket truck.  Thankfully, no bucket truck was used in our job, and we don’t own a concrete picnic table!  Below you will find a brief clip of Scott’s first day of work at our house!  

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Published in: on August 1, 2013 at 8:24 am  Comments (2)  
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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. What a huge project. I would have been a nervous wreck for sure. Glad that project is done! Enjoyed watching Scott climb the tree.

  2. I am afraid of heights so I would have been a nervous wreck … I don’t think I could have watched them working (not sure I can watch the video of Scott, even).


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